With Myranda Gillies

July 29, 2011 – 8pm

posterjuly29

July 29, 2011 – 8pm

Fighting about Steely Dan: Notes on Joy by Peter Coviello
Is there any uncooler band to be in love with than Steely Dan – Steely Dan, with their jazz-nerd preciousness, their coke-binge esoterica, their yacht-rock sensibilities? Can you think of any band whose aesthetic DNA is less present in the vast and otherwise cheerfully cannibalizing world of post-punk? Peter Coviello tells the story of an epic fight about Steely Dan, and of the discovery of a secret coherence running through their first decade’s output. And he speaks up a bit, too, against the disparagement of what is sometimes called hipster affectation, suggesting along the way that there are, in the fights we sustain around the objects that most delight us, styles of engagement with the world governed less by any economy of cool than by elements far less invidious: things like ardor, joyousness, captivation, love.

Modern Pseudoscripts by Alexander Nagel
Gibberish, nonsense, glossographia, writing in tongues, ornament, style, cryptography, geomancy, calligraphy, devil talk, noise, these are some of the themes raised by the question of pseudscripts today. “To cut a groove in language by a foreign language and to carry language to its musical limit–that is what it means to have a style.” (Gilles Deleuze)

Cool Waves / Deep Break by Myranda Gillies
Cool Waves/ Deep Break provides an unedited introduction to a cacophony of wave styles from the wet ‘n wild to the low and loud. Deep sea sounds and the big fatties that they may or may not be coming from and Middle-America mega-mall straight-edge teen tripping trends and where you can download your own MDMA will be some of the flotsam and jetsam to wash up…

Peter Coviello teaches at Bowdoin College, in Maine, and has written books about intimacy, American literature, Walt Whitman, sex in the nineteenth-century – though not, as yet, about Steely Dan.

Alexander Nagel writes about art from the Middle Ages to the present and teaches art history at NYU.

Myranda Gillies is a designer of textiles and other objects that will be useful in the future.